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Breathtaking river setting for walks and picnics

Ingram & Breamish Valley

Ingram & Breamish Valley Show full screen Ingram & Breamish Valley

A dramatic beauty spot to visit

Ingram Church by David Taylor.

Ingram Church. Photo by David Taylor.

Bronze Age burial cairns exist high above Ingram. From the third century BC there are signs of settlements here too. Ingram, was one of the ‘Ten Towns of Coquetdale’ owned by the Barony of Alnwick, under the command of a lord of the manor.

Description

Upper River Breamish by Brian Rogers.

The upper part of the River Breamish. Photo by Brian Rogers.

This stunning river setting is surrounded by high hills and a great place for walking and picnics.

The Breamish Valley is also one of the important archaeological landscapes in England.

On the hills are remains ranging from Neolithic and Bronze Age burials to hill forts, farmsteads, field systems and deserted medieval villages.

The haugh land (pronounced “hoff”) either side of the River Breamish has been visited by generations of visitors to picnic and wile away the day watching the wildlife around them.

Ingram

This little village is surrounded by pastureland and trees. The River Breamish passes along the northern edge of Powburn.

It is the ideal base for setting off on one of the many hill walks to explore the history. Another walk goes to the beautiful waterfall at Linhope Spout.

Alternatively, why not just just laze by the river and have a picnic? The choice is yours!

Getting There

From the North

Take the A1 Southbound. Leave the A1 at Morpeth for the A697 signposted Longhorsley. Continue on the A697 through Longframlington and Powburn, before taking the left turn signposted for Fawdon and Branton. Continue on to Ingram.

From the South

Take the A1 Northbound. Leave the A1 at Morpeth for the A697 signposted Longhorsley. Continue on the A697 through Longframlington and Powburn, before taking the left turn signposted for Fawdon and Branton. Continue on to Ingram.

  • At Turf Knowe, the remains of two Bronze Age (2,500 to 800 BC) burials can be seen – a circular group of stones surrounds two cists or “coffins” on one side, and slightly higher up is a tri-radial cairn (three-armed).
  • The finds from these sites can be seen at the Valley Cottage Cafe, with a film about the excavations.
Point of Interest

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Connect with Northumberland National Park

Planning

Planning in the National Park

Northumberland National Park Authority is the statutory Planning Authority for the area of the Northumberland National Park. View our planning pages here.


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